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Wednesday, 29 August 2007

Men, women, kidneys, religon and new planet

Men with younger women have more children


A woman should get together with a man several years older than herself if she wants a lot of children – at least in Sweden.

The analysis of Swedish birth records reveals that men who partner with women six years younger than themselves produce the most offspring.

Across many cultures men and women prefer younger and older mates respectively, says Martin Fieder, an anthropologist at the University of Vienna in Austria. In theory these age preferences make evolutionary sense, he says. However, there has been little reliable data on whether the preferences translate into a real advantage in terms of having children.
http://www.newscientist.com/channel/being-human/dn12557?DCMP=NLC-nletter&nsref=dn12557

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Ion thrusters


In late 2005, the spacecraft lost all the fuel for its chemical thrusters because of a leak, so mission managers have been trying to get Hayabusa home using its ion engines instead.

These engines ionise xenon gas and then use electric fields to accelerate the ions, providing a steady – though weak – thrust. They were meant to be used only for the outward journey to the asteroid.

My comment:
Yeah, babe! Ion thrusters! Now we need just the light-speed engine :)
http://space.newscientist.com/article/dn12536?DCMP=NLC-nletter&nsref=dn12536

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The hibernation diet



Hibernating animals survive the winter months in a state of torpor. Their body temperature plummets, their heart and breathing rates drop, and their metabolism changes from primarily glucose burning to fat burning. They then live on body fat reserves, sometimes for many months at a time.

Could inducing a similar state of torpor in humans also change our metabolism from glucose burning to fat burning? And if so, would this be an effective treatment for obesity?
The idea comes on the back of his team's discovery that the chemical 5-adenosine monophosphate, or 5-AMP, induces a state of torpor in mice, which do not usually hibernate. Lee says that a capsule or injection of 5-AMP could induce a similar state in humans, and the accompanying metabolic changes could help treat a range of conditions associated with obesity, such as diabetes, high blood pressure and eating disorders.
source
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RELIGION

occupies a strange position in the world today. Religious belief is as powerful as ever, yet religion is under attack, challenged by science and Enlightenment thought as never before. Critics like Richard Dawkins would have us believe that it is a delusion, and a dangerous one at that. He is one of many thinkers who are challenging the traditional view of religion as a source of morality. Instead, they argue that it provides a means for justifying immoral acts.

Their views have recently been bolstered by evidence that morality appears to be hard-wired into our brains. It seems we are born with a sense of right and wrong, and that no amount of religious indoctrination will change our most basic moral instincts.

My comment: Ha ha ha :) Totally agree :)

http://www.newscientist.com/channel/being-human/mg19526190.400?DCMP=NLC-nletter&nsref=mg19526190.400

HOW do you squeeze a kidney through a keyhole? Put it in a plastic bag and pull, it seems.



In the latest milestone in keyhole surgery, or laparoscopy, surgeons have succeeded in removing an entire kidney through a single 2.5-centimetre-wide hole in the belly button, barely leaving a scar. Kidneys are normally removed through a 25-centimetre incision across the side of the abdomen.

Pulling a fist-sized kidney through the tiny, semicircular hole involves a mixture of compressing the organ and distending the incision, says Jeffrey Cadeddu of Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas, who carried out the operation. "We place the kidney in a plastic sack like a ziplock, which is compressed as we pull it through the incision," he says. "Also, the skin stretches quite a bit."

My comment: :shock: :shock: :shock: whatever...
http://www.newscientist.com/channel/health/mg19526192.300?DCMP=NLC-nletter&nsref=mg19526192.300
And in the end:

The birth of a planet





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